page loading ... please wait
recent shows

Hydra School Projects, Art Walk
Hydra, Greece
4 July - 30 September 2009
(Participation)

Hydra School Projects
Art Walk - 10th Year Anniversary

Location: Bratsera Hotel

Sea Serpent
(in the conference room)


Sea Serpent III - 2009
Hand-folded paper and thread
Dimensions variable




Ringknot
(in the courtyard)

One hundred and eighty meters of manila rope are used for the work. The rope is unbound for a third its length from each end. The two ends of this shortened core are joined together to form a circle; the unbound lengths are woven into this central core, destroying it while creating the ringknot. The rope swallows itself with tightly coiled knottings, until the ends meet. Each separate strand is unbound and woven into its opposite; the end becomes the beginning. At each step, energy is alternately transmitted to the rope through counterclockwise twisting. This energy is not lost at the end; it is held, bound in a circle of potential energy, for as long as the knot will last.
There is the Greek word korone or koronis which apart from a crown or garland, means also the ”high point of a feast”, “the stern of a ship”, “the wavy flourish that is used to mark the end of a book, a seal of completion” and much more.
The Ringknot references the idea of wreaths, crowns or garlands, emblems of completion, dedication, celebration; and also a hidden darker meaning, the tightening coils of a serpent, an emblem of necessity.
 
For more information The Beginning and the End - A Ringknot, 1994, and Ringknot - A Woven Line, 2006.


Ringknot - 1994
Manila rope
3.20 meters (10 1/2 feet) in diameter